The Rise of the Social Savvy CEO Reply

This post was originally published on B2B Marketing. Read the full post here.

2016-06-07 09_47_25-The rise of the social savvy CEO _ B2B Marketing

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Eric Schmidt is right: 2014 = the year of mobile. What should marketers do? Reply

Eric Schmidt’s predictions aren’t always spot on and even he admits he sometimes misses the boat, but given his overwhelming success in

telecoms I wasn’t about to dismiss his claim in an interview with Bloomberg TV about 2014 trends:

“The trend has been that mobile was winning,” he said. “It’s now won.”

He may have missed the boat on social media...he may have  that the majority of new TVs sold by 2012 would have Google TV on them :)

He may have missed the boat on social media…he may have said that the majority of new TVs sold by 2012 would have Google TV on them, but I do think he’s right when it comes to his prediction about mobile.

Some of the top content marketers out there think “mobile” is too general a category to  include in their 2014 marketing trends,  but I agree with Eric – 2014 is set to be the year of mobile.

Why do I think this is the case? More…

Is it me, or are LinkedIn Company pages getting better by the day? Reply

It seems like there’s not a day that goes by where I don’t find reason to love LinkedIn’s company pages all the more. In August I realised that colleagues were “liking” the updates I posted to our company page – making the page both a useful internal communications tool as well as an effective way to spread word of our company news even further.

This past week I started thinking…..the LinkedIn company pages are so easy to update and lay the news out in such a nice way (along with stats on clickthroughs) that it’s a real shame that we can’t have this type of page for as an “in the news” page on our website.

I spoke to a web developer I work with and voila! He pointed out the new LinkedIn Company Page API. He said that there is a good chance he can build an import plugin to load the LinkedIn Company Page content into our content management system……which means that we could effectively stream our company page updates into an “in the news” page on our site.

How cool would that be?! No more clunky updating of news coverage pages!

As if all that weren’t enough

On September 12th, Buffer went and announced Buffer for LinkedIn pages. I already have a personal Buffer account for sharing my own updates to Twitter and LinkedIn, but I think it’s now time to get a business account so that we can easily share company news to Twitter, LinkedIn, our LinkedIn Company page, any relevant LinkedIn Groups, and our Google+ business page.

Watch this space – I’ll keep you posted on whether the LinkedIn import plugin experiment was successful!

It’s official. I’m addicted to Buffer Reply

Why Buffer?

Because it’s totally awesome and I can really see how this tool could help a busy company where a lot of people have a little bit of time to contribute to growing a brand via social media. I love the “team” element of this tool and I am going to spend all day tomorrow convincing a few of my colleagues as to exactly why we should use it.

What is it?buffer

It’s an online tool that allows you to populate a stream with content that Buffer later shares across your social networks at specified times throughout the day (or night). In this sense, it’s not unlike Hootsuite which, while Twitter focused in its GUI, gives you the capacity to tick other social networks when you go to share, and to schedule your sharing.

So how is it different than Hootsuite? More…

The “live” blog: Proof that the blog is alive & well Reply

I don’t need proof that the blog is alive and well. I don’t support the theory microblogging in its various forms has overtaken the blog with its bite sized, rapid fire delivery.

I don’t need to look any further than the live blog as an entity to prove that not only is the trusty web log still an essential piece of any social media marketers toolkit, but also that it’s still a dynamic medium capable of extending to incorporate various forms of microblogging to provide inclusive, up to date content (contributed by multiple authors no less).

Research Reveals Popularity of Live Blogging

This isn’t my headline or my research – it’s simply the title of a great article I read back in November and tweeted about.

I love Roy Greenslade’s definition of live blogging: More…

What I learned about social media from Steve Jobs 2

Steve Jobs wasn’t a close personal friend. Rather, I’ve spent quite a lot of time reading his biography lately. It’s a big beast of a Steve Jobsbook that I might not have had the time to read had I not had many hours to spare when my daughter was in the special care unit at Homerton Hospital….premature babies sleep a lot, and so I spent many an hour beside Ava’s bed reading about Steve Jobs – sometimes to myself, and sometimes aloud to Ava while other parents could be heard reading fairy tales to their children in the various languages of all the nationalities present in the ward.

Steve & social?

Beyond various mentions of Facebook, there is no real coverage of any thought or comment Steve Jobs might have had on social media.

What’s inspired this post is a slightly more abstract theme mentioned throughout the book, a concept familiar to me but one I hadn’t seen identified and explored at such length before.

It’s best described with a quote (from Jobs himself) that appears close to the end of the biography:

Edwin Land of Polaroid talked about the intersection of the humanities and science. I like that intersection. There’s something magical about that place. There are a lot of people innovating, and that’s not the main distinction of my career. The reason Apple resonates with people is that there’s a deep current of humanity in our innovation. I think great artists and great engineers are similar, in that they both have a desire to express themselves. In fact of some the best people working on the original Mac were poets and musicians on the side. In the seventies computers became a way for people to express their creativity [pages 567-8].

I like to think about computers helping people to express their creativity, and I couldn’t help but to think that social media has simply been an extension of this. For me, More…

Get it right and get it beyond the buzzwords…the roots of the “social web” Reply

Not long ago, before it was commonplace for pretty much everyone to have a basic understanding of the Internet, there were some fairly amusing terms flying around. The “Interweb” was one commonly used by those *not* in the “know”.

Years on, I feel the same is happening with social media. I can’t tell you how often I see the term “the social web” or variations of it, most often used in a really misinformed way….as though the “social web” is some sort of new Internet that has recently materialised. Further, the term “Web 2.0” often seems to get thrown in there haphazardly, which is a particular pet peeve of mine. I also often see the terms Web 3.0 and Web 4.0 attached to the term “the social web”.

New social media based sites and applications seem to come out daily, but it’s important to remember that social media is just the good old Internet in action, and that this thing people refer to as “the social web” are examples of various Web 2.0 enabled technologies. Web 2.0 is not a new concept.

What is Web 2.0?

Web 2.0 is a phrase used to describe attributes given web technologies that can facilitate advanced and usually interactive functionality.

A review of Internet-based literature shows two unique phases: Web 1.0 (content delivered to users by producers) and Web 2.0 (content customised to suit the individual, who has the ability to add or publish back to the site/application).

In 2005 Tim O’Reilly wrote the paper What is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation Software. His paper claims that Web 2.0 began with a conference brainstorming session between his company O’Reilly, and MediaLive International (2005: 1) and I think his thoughts on Web 2.0 still stand true today.

Importantly, O’Reilly worked to define the term “Web 2.0” beyond the buzzword stage. In his definition, he uses the example of BitTorrent, which is a free, open source file sharing application. The application uses the bandwidth of those trying to download it so that effectively, the more popular the file, the faster it can be served and downloaded (2005:5). His point in using this example is to show that the the difference between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 is that Web 2.0 services automatically get better the more people use them.

Adding to the defintion later on in the paper, O’Relly writes:

More…