2013: My top ten content marketing lessons 3

2013: A year of adjustment

First day back on the job started early.

First day back on the job started early.

If 2012 was the year of change, then 2013 was definitely the year of learning to adjust. In February, I started back at work after 7 months of maternity leave and began the frantic juggling act that all working mothers with young children must do. I am proud to say that I did manage to pull through and adjust to this new existence. I learned to stop kicking myself for not being able to blog on techtalkmarketing as much as I had done pre-baby and to use the tools out there to help me continue being a valuable content creator and marketing manager for my company.

Here’s what I learned

1. On various projects, I realised our web content was killing us. This is a topic I will expand on in 2014 because it was one of the biggest lessons I learned this year. I was lucky enough to work with talented web developers and other content creators and along the way we realised that our content was so vast and inclusive that after reading it (if indeed anyone did read it all) people had no need to ask us questions about our products and solutions.

2. Less is more. Continuing on the theme from point 1, More…

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Is it me, or are LinkedIn Company pages getting better by the day? Reply

It seems like there’s not a day that goes by where I don’t find reason to love LinkedIn’s company pages all the more. In August I realised that colleagues were “liking” the updates I posted to our company page – making the page both a useful internal communications tool as well as an effective way to spread word of our company news even further.

This past week I started thinking…..the LinkedIn company pages are so easy to update and lay the news out in such a nice way (along with stats on clickthroughs) that it’s a real shame that we can’t have this type of page for as an “in the news” page on our website.

I spoke to a web developer I work with and voila! He pointed out the new LinkedIn Company Page API. He said that there is a good chance he can build an import plugin to load the LinkedIn Company Page content into our content management system……which means that we could effectively stream our company page updates into an “in the news” page on our site.

How cool would that be?! No more clunky updating of news coverage pages!

As if all that weren’t enough

On September 12th, Buffer went and announced Buffer for LinkedIn pages. I already have a personal Buffer account for sharing my own updates to Twitter and LinkedIn, but I think it’s now time to get a business account so that we can easily share company news to Twitter, LinkedIn, our LinkedIn Company page, any relevant LinkedIn Groups, and our Google+ business page.

Watch this space – I’ll keep you posted on whether the LinkedIn import plugin experiment was successful!

It’s official. I’m addicted to Buffer Reply

Why Buffer?

Because it’s totally awesome and I can really see how this tool could help a busy company where a lot of people have a little bit of time to contribute to growing a brand via social media. I love the “team” element of this tool and I am going to spend all day tomorrow convincing a few of my colleagues as to exactly why we should use it.

What is it?buffer

It’s an online tool that allows you to populate a stream with content that Buffer later shares across your social networks at specified times throughout the day (or night). In this sense, it’s not unlike Hootsuite which, while Twitter focused in its GUI, gives you the capacity to tick other social networks when you go to share, and to schedule your sharing.

So how is it different than Hootsuite? More…

What’s on my marketing desktop? Here’s 10: 1

I thought I’d kick off my “Digital Marketing Tools Review” category by sharing a list of the programs I have open and running day to day on my desktop that help me to do my job in B2B tech marketing. I will follow soon with my top ten favourite mobile apps as well as a different post (or maybe a few) dedicated to various social media sharing sites, but for now I’ll share what keeps me going during the 9-5:30 Monday to Friday spot.

If you like the post and want to share, I’d love to hear about the tools you can’t live without.

These are a bit of a random mix of desktop applications and web based apps (they are not in any particular order):

1. Tweetdeck

Tweetdeck is my preferred app for tweeting because I need the multi-column view. I tweet from my own account and two other business related accounts, and I need to be able to see the activity in all of them all of the time. I also want to see my mentions, direct messages and the results from any given #hashtag I’m following.

2. Bitly

Bitly shortens links for my tweets and provides me with analytics so that I can who has clicked on my links.

3. Linkedin

I’ve been a member of LinkedIn since 2004 and I use it more than ever. I like the news feed stream featured on my home page and I am actively involved in several LinkedIn Groups (I will list these in
another post!) Once or twice a week, I make time to get involved in group discussions – this has been a great way to learn about everything from marketing automation to SEO. I run a LinkedIn Group for my business and as a business, we do use LinkedIn to gather intelligence on people who’ve recently made job moves or people we’d like to invite to industry events. I often “hear” about events relevant to me via LinkedIn which is useful because I can see a list of everyone attending. Lastly, I use LinkedIn for its original purpose, which is to make connections with like minded business people – I’ve been contacted and have met some extremely useful connections using LinkedIn.

4. Google Analytics

Google AnalyticsGoogle Analytics stays open on my desktop all day, every day.

I monitor the traffic of three different websites and produce daily reports to review not only top content, but also top referral sites. For a *free* tool, I have to say, Analytics is pretty impressive. I can monitor which browsers my audience use, whether they are accessing the sites via mobile devices, and how long they stay on the site. I can also identify keywords and content that are causing high bounce rates.

More…

Pinterest for the B2B tech marketeer: Part II: Let it appeal to your creative side Reply

In Pinterest for the B2B tech marketeer: Part I: Think about your customers & prospects, I noted that as a technical marketing person Pinterest may not necessarily appeal to your prospects, you may, as a social media enthusiast, find it a useful creative tool for reasons such as these:
board on Pinterest

  • Creating your own supporting visuals in the form of infographics, videos, slideshare cover slides charts or basically any image that “tell the story themselves” for blogs.
  • Creating and/or building up new concepts and fields
  • Creating mood boards
  • Promoting events

Your images & videos on Pinterest

Pinterest has been a great reminder to me that some of the best, most easily digested blogs posts are the highly visual ones, particularly the ones that contain images that illustrate the point of the post.

Creating your own infographics is a great way to make your blog posts invaluable, and “pinning” the  visuals that live in your posts to a board in More…

Pinterest for the B2B tech marketeer: Part I: Think about your customers & prospects 2

This has not been an easy post to write. In the end, I realised I didn’t have enough Pinterest knowledge or Pinterest...what's a tech B2B marketer to go?experience to write about why it was useful, useless or anything in between.  Never one to be left behind when it comes to social media trends, I joined Pinterest towards the end of 2011 but hadn’t really explored its uses.

So I jumped in and More…

Marketeer’s wishlist: QR codes on tradeshow name badges Reply

Top of my wishlist? A list of the people who *actually* attended the workshop, panel or case study presentation given by my company at an industry tradeshow.

The list of all show attendees is nice, but given the cost of actually sponsoring any of the content, I’d like to know who exactly came to listen. This is an area many tradeshow producers and event organisers often fall down on, and one easily remedied.QR Code

The Solution?

QR codes. On tradeshow name badges. If you don’t already know about QR codes, the ever-helpful Wikipeida describes them here. Simply put, they can be scanned to track data. You can create them yourself and there are even smartphone reader apps that enable you to scan them – check out the nifty iPhone QR reader app.

Why? More…