Get it right and get it beyond the buzzwords…the roots of the “social web” Reply

Not long ago, before it was commonplace for pretty much everyone to have a basic understanding of the Internet, there were some fairly amusing terms flying around. The “Interweb” was one commonly used by those *not* in the “know”.

Years on, I feel the same is happening with social media. I can’t tell you how often I see the term “the social web” or variations of it, most often used in a really misinformed way….as though the “social web” is some sort of new Internet that has recently materialised. Further, the term “Web 2.0” often seems to get thrown in there haphazardly, which is a particular pet peeve of mine. I also often see the terms Web 3.0 and Web 4.0 attached to the term “the social web”.

New social media based sites and applications seem to come out daily, but it’s important to remember that social media is just the good old Internet in action, and that this thing people refer to as “the social web” are examples of various Web 2.0 enabled technologies. Web 2.0 is not a new concept.

What is Web 2.0?

Web 2.0 is a phrase used to describe attributes given web technologies that can facilitate advanced and usually interactive functionality.

A review of Internet-based literature shows two unique phases: Web 1.0 (content delivered to users by producers) and Web 2.0 (content customised to suit the individual, who has the ability to add or publish back to the site/application).

In 2005 Tim O’Reilly wrote the paperĀ What is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation Software. His paper claims that Web 2.0 began with a conference brainstorming session between his company O’Reilly, and MediaLive International (2005: 1) and I think his thoughts on Web 2.0 still stand true today.

Importantly, O’Reilly worked to define the term “Web 2.0” beyond the buzzword stage. In his definition, he uses the example of BitTorrent, which is a free, open source file sharing application. The application uses the bandwidth of those trying to download it so that effectively, the more popular the file, the faster it can be served and downloaded (2005:5). His point in using this example is to show that the the difference between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 is that Web 2.0 services automatically get better the more people use them.

Adding to the defintion later on in the paper, O’Relly writes:

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The top excuse for a lapse in blogging is…… Reply

A new baby šŸ˜®

Our little Ava was born 8 weeks early and had to spend a week in the NICU followed by two weeks in the special care baby unit at Homerton Hospital in London.

She is still three weeks away from her due date but is now home and keeping both of her parents up around the clock…we are sleepless but head over heels šŸ˜®

“Normality” as I know it has changed, but I aim to get back to a more frequent blogging schedule from here on in.

Your blog: Integration or Separation? Part II: Separation Reply

InĀ Your blog: Integration or Separation? Part I: Integration, I explained why I think individuals and companies should almost always integrate their blogs with their websites.

The reasons for separating your blog from your website are few and far between, but they do exist.

When should you separate your blog from your website?

There are three reasons why it may sometimes be useful to create a blog that lives outside of the confines of your domain:

1. To create a “topic”. What do you sell? When prospective buyers Google your product or service, what do the search results look like? Hopefully your website *does* come up in the first few search results, but looking beyond your site, what else do you see?

If you have no competitors and no other sites of any relevance towards your product or service appear in these search results, it is time to ask yourself “do people really need what I am trying to sell?” More…