Eric Schmidt is right: 2014 = the year of mobile. What should marketers do? Reply

Eric Schmidt’s predictions aren’t always spot on and even he admits he sometimes misses the boat, but given his overwhelming success in

telecoms I wasn’t about to dismiss his claim in an interview with Bloomberg TV about 2014 trends:

“The trend has been that mobile was winning,” he said. “It’s now won.”

He may have missed the boat on social media...he may have  that the majority of new TVs sold by 2012 would have Google TV on them :)

He may have missed the boat on social media…he may have said that the majority of new TVs sold by 2012 would have Google TV on them, but I do think he’s right when it comes to his prediction about mobile.

Some of the top content marketers out there think “mobile” is too general a category to  include in their 2014 marketing trends,  but I agree with Eric – 2014 is set to be the year of mobile.

Why do I think this is the case? More…

Advertisements

2013: My top ten content marketing lessons 3

2013: A year of adjustment

First day back on the job started early.

First day back on the job started early.

If 2012 was the year of change, then 2013 was definitely the year of learning to adjust. In February, I started back at work after 7 months of maternity leave and began the frantic juggling act that all working mothers with young children must do. I am proud to say that I did manage to pull through and adjust to this new existence. I learned to stop kicking myself for not being able to blog on techtalkmarketing as much as I had done pre-baby and to use the tools out there to help me continue being a valuable content creator and marketing manager for my company.

Here’s what I learned

1. On various projects, I realised our web content was killing us. This is a topic I will expand on in 2014 because it was one of the biggest lessons I learned this year. I was lucky enough to work with talented web developers and other content creators and along the way we realised that our content was so vast and inclusive that after reading it (if indeed anyone did read it all) people had no need to ask us questions about our products and solutions.

2. Less is more. Continuing on the theme from point 1, More…

Creating a Content Marketing Plan: Part II Reply

ContentMarketingPuzzleAt long last, I’ve got a draft of my content marketing plan! Read part I of this post to see how I started out.

It’s been a challenging and rewarding exercise that has not only highlighted the significance of business elements such as geography, but also the importance of both themes central to the business and the stages of sales/buying cycle.

However most importantly, this exercise has taught me that what I’ve got now really is a draft and not the final content marketing plan. This is because in this instance, I need input from across the organisation. I’ve developed and applied a strategy to creating a content marketing plan and I’ve developed a structure that I’ve dropped ideas into. More…

Creating a Content Marketing Plan: Part I 4

This week I’ve been allotted the somewhat daunting task of creating a content marketing plan to span the 12 months going forward. As a digital

Excel may be the perfect starting point

Excel may be the perfect starting point

marketer I love playing with social media and other delivery channels, but let’s be honest:

Content is the life and soul of the party.

Without content, I’d be left with an amazing digital marketing communications infrastructure that went completely unused! And with content being such top priority, it is not surprising that any company would want a well-researched, thoughtfully constructed content marketing plan.

While constructing a content marketing plan is not an easy task, I would say it’s so far been a rewarding one – you very quickly realise potential marketing opportunities and gaps simply by analysing the content you do have and brainstorming from there.

Getting started on your content marketing plan:  Spare me the templates More…

What I learned about social media from Steve Jobs 2

Steve Jobs wasn’t a close personal friend. Rather, I’ve spent quite a lot of time reading his biography lately. It’s a big beast of a Steve Jobsbook that I might not have had the time to read had I not had many hours to spare when my daughter was in the special care unit at Homerton Hospital….premature babies sleep a lot, and so I spent many an hour beside Ava’s bed reading about Steve Jobs – sometimes to myself, and sometimes aloud to Ava while other parents could be heard reading fairy tales to their children in the various languages of all the nationalities present in the ward.

Steve & social?

Beyond various mentions of Facebook, there is no real coverage of any thought or comment Steve Jobs might have had on social media.

What’s inspired this post is a slightly more abstract theme mentioned throughout the book, a concept familiar to me but one I hadn’t seen identified and explored at such length before.

It’s best described with a quote (from Jobs himself) that appears close to the end of the biography:

Edwin Land of Polaroid talked about the intersection of the humanities and science. I like that intersection. There’s something magical about that place. There are a lot of people innovating, and that’s not the main distinction of my career. The reason Apple resonates with people is that there’s a deep current of humanity in our innovation. I think great artists and great engineers are similar, in that they both have a desire to express themselves. In fact of some the best people working on the original Mac were poets and musicians on the side. In the seventies computers became a way for people to express their creativity [pages 567-8].

I like to think about computers helping people to express their creativity, and I couldn’t help but to think that social media has simply been an extension of this. For me, More…