Your blog: Integration or Separation? Part II: Separation Reply

In Your blog: Integration or Separation? Part I: Integration, I explained why I think individuals and companies should almost always integrate their blogs with their websites.

The reasons for separating your blog from your website are few and far between, but they do exist.

When should you separate your blog from your website?

There are three reasons why it may sometimes be useful to create a blog that lives outside of the confines of your domain:

1. To create a “topic”. What do you sell? When prospective buyers Google your product or service, what do the search results look like? Hopefully your website *does* come up in the first few search results, but looking beyond your site, what else do you see?

If you have no competitors and no other sites of any relevance towards your product or service appear in these search results, it is time to ask yourself “do people really need what I am trying to sell?” More…

Advertisements

Your blog: Integration or Separation? Part I: Integration 1

Not long ago, this question came through this week in my weekly digest email from The UK Marketing Network.

“Isn’t it obvious?” I said to myself, ready to delete the email. But then I paused and reminded myself that it wasn’t that long ago I wouldn’t have known the answer to this question either, and that it’s not always obvious at all. I looked closer at the next line in the query which read:

We are starting a new blog and we are unsure whether to integrate it with our website or keep it separate? Does anyone have any experience with this?

It’s actually a really good question – one that more people should ask themselves

I started my answer with:

I can think of very few instances where you’ll benefit from keeping your blog separate from your corporate website.

Effectively your blog is where you’ll put a lot of effort into generating excellent thought leadership based content – keeping this inside your domain will boost your SEO measurably and send a lot of traffic to your site (which surely is what any business wants?)

More reasons More…

Attention digital marketers! Google Panda: 10 questions answered 1

1. What is it? No one (including Google) says it better than Wikipedia who say: Google
Panda
 is a change to the Google’s search results ranking algorithm that was first released in February 2011. The change aimed to lower the rank of “low-quality sites”, and return higher-quality sites near the top of the search results.

What I say: An algorithm is a step by step procedure used for calculations. Remember that the change to Google’s algorithm is based on the *human* testing of thousands of websites for quality. The aim behind Panda is to ensure searches return you quality sites…..sites that deserve to be high in search rankings.

2. Why did Google implement it? It’s all about survival. More…